Due to COVID-19, most court functions in the state have been suspended. In addition, our office is working remotely. For assistance, please email esr@mmzlaw.com with your contact information and the legal matter you need help with and someone will be in touch. If you are seeking help regarding a Will, Financial, or Health Care Power of Attorney, every effort will be made to respond as quickly as possible.

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How Guardianship Works in Pennsylvania—and Why This Legal Process is Often a Last Resort

Gavel and striking block on law book with "Guardianship" title on wooden desk

This year, just about every news and media outlet has picked up the ongoing story of 39-year-old pop star Britney Spears, who has been living under a conservatorship—called guardianship in Pennsylvania and many other states—for well over a decade. While a ward, Ms. Spears released several albums, undertook a world tour performing her music, and … Read more

How to File Estate-Related Taxes in Pennsylvania

Concept image with the word TAXES spelled out in wooden blocks

It’s hard to believe that tax time is upon us once again. Just like the blooming daffodils and our Lancaster Country farmers preparing their fields for planting, tax time is a springtime ritual—even if no one celebrates it!

With that in mind, you probably landed on this article because you have nagging questions about working through various types of estate-related taxes. You’ve come to the right place, as we often cover taxing matters related to estate administration here on the blog.

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Can Video Footage Make or Break Your Personal Injury Case?

Surveillance camera on the wall in an office building

It’s no secret that video cameras are all around us. In public spaces like stores, banks, airports, and even on the streets of many towns, we’re continuously being monitored by video—and often recorded. While video surveillance footage is typically gathered in the name of public safety—by police body cams and traffic cameras, for instance—it’s true that it can have broader applications, and it’s particularly useful in personal injury cases.

In fact, one of the first things insurance adjusters—as well as personal injury attorneys—look for when investigating an injury claim or case is video footage that might show how a person was hurt.

Whether it’s a slip and fall/premises liability case or a pedestrian accident that resulted in significant injury or wrongful death, there are often video or still photography images available related to the original incident that could be useful as evidence. Even in car accident cases, video surveillance footage is commonly available now, thanks to the ubiquity of cameras.

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What is a Hit and Run Car Accident?

side profile of a wrecked car after a hit and run accident

In a previous post here on the blog, we detailed the typical process for dealing with hit and run cases when victims are considering their options for pursuing civil action against a hit and run driver. That post covers the basics of what drivers on our Pennsylvania roadways should know—and do—if they become injured in a drunk driving accident or another type of crash in which a responsible party leaves the scene.

But what does the term “hit and run” actually mean? And how can you protect yourself and your loved ones from being left with astronomical medical bills and property damage perpetrated by a hit and run driver? Today’s post offers a little insight into just these questions.

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Guardianship Versus Power of Attorney Designations: What’s the Difference?

Older gentleman and daughter working on his estate plan with a lawyer

A little while ago, we published a post here on the blog as part of our Complete Guide to Estate Planning series covering all of the most vital estate planning documentation you need to consider.

High on that list of essential documents is a power of attorney (POA) designation—or perhaps more than one—allowing you to designate a specific trusted individual or individuals, like family members or other loved ones, to be in charge of your affairs or help you make financial decisions, healthcare decisions, and more.

Today’s post focuses a little bit more closely on why experienced probate and estate lawyers strongly recommend setting up POA designations as part of your estate plan to be fully prepared for all eventualities as you age. In the question of guardianship vs. POA, you want to avoid your family needing to seek guardianship.

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Our Top Tips on How to Hire a Lawyer

Prospective client meeting with a lawyer for the first time

Whether you’re working through estate administration for a friend or family member and have questions about probate, or you have been hurt in an accident or on the job and need assistance from an experienced personal injury attorney, hiring a lawyer can seem intimidating.

Typing “lawyers near me” into Google and calling the first law firm or solo practice attorney that pops up is risky, as you likely won’t know much about that lawyer’s expertise in the specific area of law you need. And, while most attorneys will be upfront with you about their legal specializations and types of cases they handle, there are some with little experience who may be less than transparent about their credentials.

Indeed, hiring a lawyer is a little bit like interviewing candidates for an essential job in your company. You want to choose a candidate who has the right experience and is an excellent fit for the job you’re offering. However, many people—unless they work in human resources or own their own business—have likely never conducted a hiring process.

That’s why today’s blog post offers some of our best tips on how to hire a lawyer.

Whether you decide to consult with one of our caring family law, estates and probate, or personal injury attorneys here at May, Herr & Grosh, or you go with another law firm, we want you to have confidence in the lawyer you ultimately hire so that your legal matter or case is handled with the proper care.

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Social Media as Evidence: What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You

Concept graphic related to social media and the law

Whether your court case relates to personal injury or a family law matter like divorce or custody, posting the wrong things on social media—even if your account isn’t fully viewable by just anyone—could negatively impact your case.

In an earlier blog post, we talked about how video footage from the scene of an accident or fall can make or break your personal injury case potentially based on mobile device footage taken by someone else. Social media posts made by other parties—or by you yourself—can be harmful, too, whether or not those posts contain video.

The fact is, social media posts on platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and the like can be found by insurance companies and investigators—and manipulated during litigation and used as evidence against you. And you don’t necessarily need to be in a formal court trial for these posts to reflect poorly on you. Even the most experienced attorneys may not be able to help you prevail if you post certain things online that present you in a negative light to a judge or jury.

Today’s blog post focuses just a little bit more closely on how social media as evidence may be brought to bear in your legal case.

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5 Tips for Implementing an Effective Work from Home Policy

While working from home, or telecommuting, has become increasingly popular in many workplaces, COVID-19 has now made it a necessity for many organizations. As we continue to adapt to the new normal both during and after the pandemic, it’s clear that allowing employees to work from home will become a more common practice. However, as … Read more

Estate Planning FAQ: What are Tenants in Common?

Two people signing paperwork to become tenants in common on home purchase

When it comes to estate planning, there are many legal terms involved that can cause confusion. If you are attempting to take a DIY approach without help from an experienced probates and estates attorney, you’re likely going to have a lot of questions.

The term “tenants in common,” as well as the term “joint tenancy”—both of which refer to ways real estate property ownership may be structured—are two that often raise questions for those outside the legal world. That’s why we’re dedicating today’s blog post to explaining this terminology in a little more detail. Both ownership structures have benefits and drawbacks, and they affect how property is transferred to heirs.

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